Training: Government guidance following lockdown


On January 4, 2021, Boris Johnson announced a third national lockdown in England to curb the spread of coronavirus.

Here, we look at the implications of the Government’s latest guidance on training in the sector.

This is an extract from Government guidance:

Following the Prime Minister’s announcement confirming a new national lockdown, training providers, employers and EPAOs must ensure that training and assessment takes place remotely wherever possible.

Face-to-face training and assessment can continue in colleges and training providers’ premises for vulnerable young apprentices and the children of key workers who need it. Face-to-face training and assessment can also continue in employers’ Covid-secure settings where it is essential for workers to attend their workplace, and where it is safe and practical to do so.

End-point assessment (EPA) and Functional Skills (FSQ) assessments can continue in colleges, training providers’ premises, assessment venues and workplaces where it cannot be conducted remotely and where providers and end-point assessment organisations (EPAOs) judge it right to do so.

Training providers, employers and EPAOs must ensure that training and assessment takes place remotely. As set out below, there are exceptional arrangements for training and assessment for vulnerable young apprentices and the children of key workers who need it; and for apprentices who are due to undertake EPA and FSQ assessment.

We recognise that for some apprenticeship programmes which normally involve substantial use of practical equipment and demonstration of applied knowledge this new guidance will be particularly challenging. We have seen strong examples of how providers have adapted training and assessment using virtual scenarios, and live lessons.

We have also seen providers adjust the sequencing of apprenticeships to concentrate practical learning when on-site training is possible. This approach should be taken as far as possible to ensure that training can continue. We know that receiving face-to-face training is best for apprentices’ mental health and for their educational achievement. We will continue to review the six restrictions on apprenticeship providers and assessment organisations and will ensure that apprentices return to face-to-face education as soon as possible. Where these restrictions prevent apprenticeship training continuing for a period of more than four weeks the apprentice, employer and provider should agree to institute a break in learning and resume training when this is possible.

For the full guidance, click here

 

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